Recent Articles

Discover Waldorf Education: Helping Your Child’s Teacher Communicate

Although Waldorf schools are unique in “honoring the oral tradition” as a viable means of transmitting knowledge, they are not immune to the “communication problems” that are rampant in virtually every institution in our time. What follows are some suggestions to ameliorate this problem, and to open up the conduits of conversation that must underlie every healthy parent/teacher relationship.

Discover Waldorf Education: Guns and Doses

Should Young Children Play with Guns?

Parents often ask whether Waldorf kindergarteners should be allowed to play with toy guns (or imaginary guns) in school or at home. A powerful article by Susan Johnson, M.D., exemplifies feelings commonly expressed in Waldorf schools — and Eugene’s commentary on her article provides yet another perspective.

The Waldorf Curriculum: Grade One

Block Rotations and Course Descriptions

As he or she progresses through Grades One through Eight, the Waldorf class teacher must determine not only what will be taught, but also how and when. The “block rotation” presented here, as well as the descriptions of the subjects to be taught and the week-by-week approach to this teaching, will hopefully inspire class teachers to develop their own modus operandi for this challenging task.

The Waldorf Curriculum: Grade Eight

Block Rotations and Course Descriptions

As he or she progresses through Grades One through Eight, the Waldorf class teacher must determine not only what will be taught, but also how and when. The “block rotation” presented here, as well as the descriptions of the subjects to be taught and the week-by-week approach to this teaching, will hopefully inspire class teachers to develop their own modus operandi for this challenging task.

Anthroposophy and Waldorf Education: The Kindergarten Years

Waldorf education was born out of the worldview of its founder, Rudolf Steiner. This philosophical foundation, known as “anthroposophy,” postulates that the education of the child accompanies and nurtures the process of “incarnation,” allowing the child to interweave its spirit and soul with a physical body. The kindergarten years are a critical foundation for this process, hence the central role of the N/K teachers in the Waldorf school setting.

Discover Waldorf Education: Assessing Without Testing

“No Child Left Behind” has solidified the ranks of those who believe that high-stakes testing is the only way to advance education. We examine the innovative Waldorf approach to assessment in which learning outcomes are judged in myriad ways — all of them child-friendly, and all of them effective.

Discover Waldorf Education: Knitting and Intellectual Development

The Role of Handwork in the Waldorf Curriculum

Knitting has recently become remarkably popular among college students and celebrities — but it has been a pillar of the Waldorf school curriculum for ninety years. We examine the many ways in which knitting and other handwork activities stimulate intellectual development and instill a sense of achievement in the child.

Anthroposophy and Waldorf Education: Blinking, Feeling, and Willing

A Review of "Blink" by Malcolm Gladwell (Little, Brown & Co., 2005)

Malcolm Gladwell’s popular study of the intuitive experience sheds interesting light on some of Rudolf Steiner’s psychological insights. Gladwell’s lively recounting of individuals who “acted first and thought later” can be of help to the sometimes moribund atmosphere of the Waldorf faculty meeting.

Discover Waldorf Education: The Teaching of History

For over ninety years, the Waldorf school approach to the teaching of history has been based on two principles. Throughout the tumultuous and mutable twentieth century, and now into the twenty-first, the Waldorf history curriculum has remained true to its focus on the myths, legends and biographies that underlie the development of “Western culture.”

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