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Eugene Schwartz

A graduate of Columbia University, Eugene Schwartz has worked with all stages of life, from the young child to the elderly and the dying. He began his teaching career by adapting the Waldorf schools’ curriculum to educate a group of handicapped and emotionally disturbed adolescents, after which he became a class teacher at Green Meadow Waldorf School. After many years of service to Green Meadow, Eugene now works worldwide as an educational consultant and lecturer. He currently serves as a Fellow of the Research Institute for Waldorf Education.

Anthroposophy and Waldorf Education: The Web as Will and Idea

Can Digital Media be Redeemed?

Several years ago the renowned anthroposophist Sergei Prokofieff wrote a remarkable article entitled “The Being of the Internet,” in which he argued that the digital media are carriers of such darkness that they are unredeemable. Eugene Schwartz has written a response to this essay in which he contends that the use to which the media are put is of greater import than the nature of the media themselves. Eugene’s article, “The Web as Will and Idea,” was recently published in News for Members and Friends, the newsletter of the Anthroposophical Society in America.

Anthroposophy and Waldorf Education: Talking About iGeneration

It may be helpful to be able to look at the past and see how humanity has faced phenomena similar to modern computers and media. We can be terribly arrogant when it comes to trumpeting everything contemporary as having no precedent, a danger in dismissing the wisdom, however fragile it might be, that has developed from meeting similar situations in the past. This essay is attempt to examine some of the historical foundations of today’s computer culture.

The Waldorf Curriculum: Grade Seven

Block Rotations and Course Descriptions

As he or she progresses through Grades One through Eight, the Waldorf class teacher must determine not only what will be taught, but also how and when. The “block rotation” presented here, as well as the descriptions of the subjects to be taught and the week-by-week approach to this teaching, will hopefully inspire class teachers to develop their own modus operandi for this challenging task.

The Waldorf Curriculum: Grade Six

Block Rotations and Course Descriptions

As he or she progresses through Grades One through Eight, the Waldorf class teacher must determine not only what will be taught, but also how and when. The “block rotation” presented here, as well as the descriptions of the subjects to be taught and the week-by-week approach to this teaching, will hopefully inspire class teachers to develop their own modus operandi for this challenging task.

The Waldorf Curriculum: Grade Five

Block Rotations and Subject Descriptions

As he or she progresses through Grades One through Eight, the Waldorf class teacher must determine not only what will be taught, but also how and when. The “block rotation” presented here, as well as the descriptions of the subjects to be taught and the week-by-week approach to this teaching, will hopefully inspire class teachers to develop their own modus operandi for this challenging task.

The Waldorf Curriculum: Verses for the Primary Grades

In the Waldorf school recitation, games, and songs play a central role in strengthening the memory and providing a spatial and kinesthetic foundation for learning. This is a collection of verses that Eugene Schwartz wrote for his class as he shepherded them through the primary grades. They are used by Waldorf teachers throughout the world and may be freely downloaded.

The Waldorf Curriculum: Grade Four

Block Rotations and Subject Descriptions

As he or she progresses through Grades One through Eight, the Waldorf class teacher must determine not only what will be taught, but also how and when. The “block rotation” presented here, as well as the descriptions of the subjects to be taught and the week-by-week approach to this teaching, will hopefully inspire class teachers to develop their own modus operandi for this challenging task.

The Waldorf Curriculum: Grade Three

Block Rotations and Course Descriptions

As he or she progresses through Grades One through Eight, the Waldorf class teacher must determine not only what will be taught, but also how and when. The “block rotation” presented here, as well as the descriptions of the subjects to be taught and the week-by-week approach to this teaching, will hopefully inspire class teachers to develop their own modus operandi for this challenging task.

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